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to help us prevent any incidents happening. >> reporter: never before would you see afghan police patrolling in american humvees. authorities are confident the taliban won't be able to stop voters from heading to polling station. >> in case something happened, those will be i.d.s. which are difficult. or some sporadic shooting from outside of the city like from the districts but also we want to minimize those when we send forces to the district as well. >> reporter: the facr naeshing districts of kandahar city have a strong taliban presence and thursday's voting day will show just how tight the noose is around this capital. ze ina kandahar. >>> next door in helmand province offensive by american and british troops has been under way for a while. one immediate goal is to push back the taliban so that more people can vote thursday but as lindsay hill som, after decades of warfare. remains skeptical about the motives the foreign troops and fearful of their own safety. >> reporter: coming into land in what the british call a liberated area. seized from the taliban in operation princes
to the show. let's start off with iraq. the security situation there was assumed to be improving and so u.s. forces could do an aggressive pullout and some suggested that schedule to be accelerated to be out of iraq by 2011. security situation there is a little bit rougher. brian, any chance that u.s. forces will stay there beyond 2011? >> i think there are clear signs in the last couple of weeks there are ethnic tensions, very strong ones still simmering just beneath the surface and growing concern that could come out into the open. certainly there are extremists that are trying to stoke those fires again. and certainly the u.s. military expresses concern that this could get out of hand. on the other hand they are encouraged that so far things have been relatively stable. that the shiah population have been reserved in not responding to these more recent attacks. but having said that, with the elections coming up in january for the parliament in iraq, there is very little chance i think there will be some movement further movement on the political reconciliation that needs to happen becaus
thank you for joining us. [captioning made possible by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- martha: this is the "live desk." i am martha maccallum. trace: i am trace gallagher. this is where the news begins. if you swing over here, this is the foreign desk covering the globe. every single picture that comes into fox news channel comes in right here along the media desk. here on the "live desk" we begin with break-in news. martha: disturbing new information on what may have motivated a shooting spree at a pennsylvania health club. a man shot and killed a three women during the wounded nine others when he opened fire in an aerobics class in pennsylvania. >> a lot of people started running around. i took off my headphones and i kept hearing boom, boom, boom. i heard about 30 shots. i started ducking down. i got out as fast as i could. i helped carry out one girl who was shot in the thigh. she kept saying she was going to die. it is crazy stuff. i am in shock. martha: the shooter was keeping a block ofblog the detailed his hatred of women.
ago, candidate obama traveled to europe and said that he was not appearing as a candidate for u.s. president but as a fellow citizen of the world. mr. obama sees the world under his leadership as an active and interactive player as part of the international community. apparently the international community believes that we are and obama sees himself on center stage of that grade world amphitheater. the effect of this transformation is that america's popularity is now soaring. the percent of germans who viewed the u.s. favorably today is 64%, up 31% from 2008 poll. to the pugh, global the u.k., 69%, up from g last year. the french three-quarters, 75% of frenchmen now see america favorably versus 42% in 2008. so what is the big lever that has moved the seesaw of america's popularity so radically upward? acknowledgement of world citizenship? yes. but was it also this public apologetic admission by president obama? >> in america, there's a failure to appreciate europe's leading role in the world. instead of celebrating your dynamic union and seeking to partner with you to meet common
didn't use the word competent when he said that mccain said what the party needs to do is recruit hispanics but not just because they are hispanic. possibility same meaning but not the same word. we just thought we would let you know. here is suzanne malveaux now in for wolf blitzer in "the situation room." >> thanks, rick. happening now, breaking news, north korea pardons two imprisoned american journalists after extraordinary intervention by former president bill clinton, taking his case directly to kim jong-il in north korea. the two women convicted of hostile acts and serving a 12-year sentence of hard labor. now we are learning new details about what the former president has to do and say to win their freedom and when they will be coming home. >>> wolf blitzer is off today. i'm suzanne malveaux in cnn's command center for breaking news, politics, extraordinary reports from around the world. you are in "the situation room." >>> we are following breaking news this hour t is a stunning turn of events in north korea where former president bill clinton made a surprise trip to win
would always be kind of aside and smaller. and it would be all three of us. she drew a picture and i was the sister and it was just her and i. and i didn't even know what to say. you know. i still have to say, thank you, hon, that's a beautiful picture. deep down inside, she didn't include her mother which really made me sad. >> hard to imagine what it was like for this family thinking there was a chance hannah might not see her mother for another 12 years. for laura ling, it was a husband and family waiting for her. a sushi dinner and perhaps mother's essential watercress soup which she's been keeping warm the last few days in anticipation. al gore spoke briefly today. his farmer boss, bill clinton, though, did not. president obama spoke of relief and gratitude where laura ling, silence for months, spoke at length. when she did, people across the country seemed to choke up a little. >> 30 hours ago euna lee and i were prisoners in north korea. we feared that at any moment we could be sent to a hard labor camp. and then suddenly we were told that we were going to a meeting. we were t
the tv news pioneer don hewitt dead at the age of 86. we thank you for being with us tonight. please join us here tomorrow. we thank you for watching. good night from new york. next, campbell brown. >>> tonight hear the questions we want answered. will the civil war in the democratic party doom health care reform? >> the democrats are imploding. >> the president tries to get on message while his own party tries to get past the in-fighting. >>> will democracy prevail in afghanistan? the polls open in less than three hours and voting could be deadly. >> armed men going house to house. >> in iraq, six coordinated bombings kill nearly 100 people in baghdad. do we pull back too soon? what really happened when the mayor of milwaukee was beaten with a metal pipe? >> things got very, very ugly very, very quickly. >> for the first time, hear from a politician being called here go this is really bad. this is really bad. >> also, the supermodel who fought back against a cyber bully. she sued google and won. find out how her case helped detect you online. and hurricane bill now a categor
the seller was offering it to us. >> the taliban is trying hard to derail the -- a suicide bomber killed 10, including two u.s. workers. the chief spokesman is arrested. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later for you -- farewell sunshine. south korea mourns the death of the president who championed a reconciliation with the north. and he never cooks at home, but he is big on breakfast tv. a celebrity chef. hello to you. thousands of voting cards offered for thousands of dollars in bribes to buy votes. the bbc has uncovered evidence of fraud and corruption. this in the run-up to the election in afghanistan. the afghan election commission has denied that voting cards are being sold and said in any case that can only be used for the rightful owners. questions are being asked how credible the poll can be. we have this report. >> the city is full of rumors about this election -- fraud, corruption, and backroom deals with notorious war lords. we were given a tipoff the voting cards were being sold in cobble -- kabul. an afghan posed as a buy
-628-0205. you can reach us on twitter, twitter.com/c-spanwj. you can also reach us by e-mail, journal@c-span.org. if you call in, make sure that you turn down your television or radio so that you do not feed back. we will start with the front page of "the wall street journal." "taliban is now winning." this is the report from peter spiegel in washington. "the commander, general stanley mcchrystal, has offered a preview of the strategic assessment that he is going to deliver to washington later this month, saying that the troop shifts are designed to better protect the afghanistan civilians from rising levels of taliban violence and intimidation. the coming redeployments are the clearest manifestation on the death toll and spike in military deaths in afghanistan." we will look at that chart this morning, the mounting toll of the u.s. troop casualties in afghanistan. another article this morning from the philadelphia -- "philadelphia inquirer." de "the president's national security adviser did not rule out adding more u.s. forces in afghanistan to help turn around a war that he said yes
for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> an historic meeting between former u.s. president bill clinton and north korea's kim jong-il. and reports say two jailed american journalists have been freed. australian police belief they have foiled a major terrorist plot. four suspects accuse of links with somali extremist. >> a woman goes on trial accused of dressing indies ently. she wore trousers in a restaurant. welcome to "bbc world news." broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later, what kind of policing do you call this? a new human rights report says too many of india's place are abusive and failing at their job. a hollywood actress takes send moo on the road. >> cinema is for everybody and everywhere. we are knowing how few opportunities there are for people to realize how incredibly wise cinema is. >> hello. a secretive come nist state with nuclear ambitions which has been playing fast and loose with the rest of the world. today they have been playing host to bill clinton, the most senior visitor in a decade. he met north korean leader, kim jong-i
a stormy meeting between hamid karzai and the u.s. special envoy. >>> in japan unemployment sores on the eve of national elections there. a youth movement sweeping the country and the party that has ruled japan for decades may be on the way out. >>> in sub-saharan africa, malaria still kills more than a million people a year. now comes hope of a vaccine that could save countless lives. >>> and sailing solo. tonight, a look at two teens and their quest to go arou world alone. in britain, it's considered a challenge. in holland, it could be a case of child abuse. >> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here's what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible in part by the following funders -- >> major support has also been provided by the peter g. peterson foundation dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> we are going to start tonight with afghanist, where the death of a u.s. soldier today made this the deadliest month of the eight-ye
work in one weekend. wealthy logistics of that for us we would have to get an instructor there for the weekend. we would obviously want as many students as possible that weekend to make the instructor cost-effective. the fact the student had to leave their family, spend a night away, the whole thing was quite logistically complicated and believe it or not, hundreds and hundreds of workers though did it because it was one of the only ways they had to get these skills. now, all of our labs are done remotely so that students -- we no longer have those physical labs, and now students can access raÚl person remotely -- routers remotely from wherever they are doing their course work, usually their homes and the instructor can either be they they can do troubleshooting which is part of the lab and the instructors can see step by step what they've done, so there's no requirement for them to go anywhere else. so this has been actually huge. it's very, very helpful to the students and to us. the video i've talked about, that's also been important. the last thing i'll say about the
that democrats are using that as an excuse but maybe republicans are giving them one to push forward without them. >> ed henry, if this is true and seriously under consideration it seems a far cry from what we were hearing over the weekend from the white house, from kathleen sebelius, from the president himself, from robert gibbs talking about the public option being one of several things and the key thing is competition and choice. to go from that to suddenly moving forward ramming this thing through it seems like all day today they have been saying nothing is changing. it seems like a lot has changed. >> you are right. that is why they are not pulling the trigger tonight on this. over the weekend it was about the president showing flexibility saturday night on the town hall. maybe there won't be a public option. kathleen sebelius leaving the door open to no public option. she didn't close the door either. that was about trying to bring in kent conrad, a conservative democrat like ben nelson in the senate, show flexibility. if they ram this through with this procedural motion that will close tha
killed by a u.s. missile strike. will it bring an end to his campaign of violence? >>> we mark the anniversary of the brief but brutal war between russia and georgia that left hundreds dead. tonight we look at the legacy of anger that remains. >>> how they see it. tonight, we get the british take on an american investment bank, goldman sachs. its huge profits and big bonuses in spite of a sputtering economy have some wonderinabout government connections. >>> and hell on earth. tonight, we take you to a sulfur mine in java where the workers get a good wage, but may be paying with their health. >>> from the world's leading reporters and analysts, here is what's happening from around the world. this is "worldfocus." made possible, in part, by the following funders -- >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge. >>> for months, he was the top target of the cia and pakistan's military, baitullah mehsud, the head of the taliban in pakistan. a notorious militant commander who controlled a wide area of pakistan's northwest. a man whose organization killed hundreds of security forces and civil
of the united states. thanks, fellows, for joining us. earlier, i asked you what you thought. who's a bigger threat to health care reform. 83% said conservative democrats. i'm going to hammer them on this show every night. 17% think the town hall screamers are going to actually have an effect. the conservative democrats, i got now in my cross hairs when it comes to cross hairs. you're wrong, you've got to support the president on a public option. that's it. see you tomorrow. have a great one. >>> rage against the machine. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm lawrence o'donnell in new york in tonight for chris matthews. leading off tonight, face-off. we now know how to get your name and picture on the front page "the new york times." say something loud and nasty to a senator and they'll put you above the fold. if there is one lesson we've learned from all the angry health care town hall meetings, it is that it's a lot easier to get a crowd of people who are opposed to reform than a crowd in favor. the big question is how many of these noisy opponents have been organized into position
which claimed over 50 lives. his home has been a sanctuary for al-qaeda, a problem for britain and the u.s.. he has focused on targets here at home, bombing of pakistan because it backs the west. security in islamabad is being stepped up for fierce his followers could try to take revenge. -- for fears his followers could try to take revenge. he declared war on his own country and people. they told us they do not believe he is dead. they have heard that before. others say they have a sense of relief, not just for pakistan, but for the world. >> we do not need these people in power. we are not believing in what he is doing. he is absolutely bad for us and our nation. >> another said that america was bad, too, for killing innocent civilians with drones. it was a drone which targeted baitullah mehsud, able to reach him in a remote terrain where troops could not. the mission was directed from thousands of miles away. the white house is suggesting it was a job well done. >> if the reports of baitullah mehsud's death are correct, there is no doubt the pakistani people are safer as a result of it.
corporations. what can we do for you? >> the u.s. and dips its toe again in somalia. it is not sending soldiers this time, it says, but military support and aid. three indians convicted of the 2003 mumbai tax get the death penalty. keeping watch on on -- on call sam -- uncle sam. coming up later for you, can jumping off rocks into the sea be safe? it sure it can, says the organizer of a new coastal pursuit. mourning the passing of sam the koala. hello to the u.s. secretary of state has publicly warned eritrea that the u.s. will take action against the country if it does not stop supporting militants in somalia. hillary clinton promises to expand help for somalia's week interim governments, threatened by al qaeda-linked terrorists. she met somalia's president today in kenya. >> a mark of respect for those killed during a terror attack 11 years ago in central nairobi. the american embassy was bombed, and the victims were mostly canyons. that attack was blamed on al qaeda. the american secretary of state believes threats of terrorism remain. >> it is an opportunity to renew our resolve. we need to
councilwoman y vet alexander asking someone to call 911. many of us were here for a news conference called by the mayor on hiv and aids awareness. the tan vehicle was smoking. i never saw flames but somebody got a fire extinguisher. eyewitnesses tried to rush to pull open doors to get the drivers and passengers out of both vehicles. they removed some of the injured before firefighters could get here to use the jaws of life to remove them. the more seriously injured were medivaked to the hospital. it was terrifying and amazing to see the accident then to watch people including top city officials trying to help out. >> everywhere. she wanted to get out. she was conscious and everything. she was squeezing our hand and everything. we tried to keep her together until the ambulance and stuff got there. >> you don't know if anybody has a neck injury. it's great help. people's natural instincts. it's one of those things we have to be careful. that's why we are using the jaws of life and other things to get people out safely. >> we really do keep all of our energy focused on the five people who wer
. they will be on display at the memorial. netanyahu used the occasion to refer to lessons that should be learned from the holocaust. >> it does not happen because the main civilized power of the powers of the day did not act in time to stop the arming of barbarism and armed barbarism knows now limits and has to be unarmed, disarmed in time. >> reporter: netanyahu also said that he expected chancellor merkel to take a strong stand against iran's nuclear ambitions. he said iran posed a direct threat to israel's security. merkel said germany is prepared to take a tougher line with iran if that becomes necessary. >> translator: iran has been asked to participate in negotiations. if they fail to respond to these requests, we will consider stronger sanctions in the energy sector and other appropriate sectors such as the financial sector. in fact, we will not merely consider this, we will discuss with the international community how best to implement these sanctions. >> reporter: merkel said netanyahu should show more flexibility and ott issue of settlements on palestinian land. germany has called on israel
and the u.s. military had to provide him one en route. shepard: a lot of troubles from that building with the north korean government. the overall relationship, how is it affected? >> well, secretary of state clinton offered today if the north koreans want to come back to six-party talks, they are welcome, but it's not clear whether the north koreans will take that up. in fact, the biggest thing that will probably come out of this is the intel that we will gain from bill clinton sitting across from kim jong-il who you will remember reportedly had a stroke last year in august and no foreigner has seen him ever since. shepard: jennifer griffin live at the pentagon. jen, thanks so much. a couple of notes you may not have heard about this story. former president clinton apparently was not the only man considered for this job. "the new york times" is reporting now that the white house list of potential candidates included some other big names. among them, the former vice president al gore. again the women worked for his cable network. and the new mexico governor bill richardson who travel
could think of that is that crazy has already been actually used by these people. there are these crazy conspiracy theories about health care reform on the one hand. and on the other hand there are these organized efforts to shut down political debate about health care by using angry crowds to take over town hall meetings and chase congressmen through parking lots. these two observable facts about the antihealth care reform forces, it turns out, are really one big thing. do yourself a favor if you have a moment and you're online and go to the website recess rally.com. it's a very nice website. very slick. got a big stop sign right there in the middle above the list of all the town hall rallies they expect you to go to and disrupt. the tag line up there you can see is we the people say no to socialized health care. we the people. that's how the republican party has been describing these town hall takeovers, too. putting out a statement today saying democrats should stop being so upset about them. quote, what democrats call mob rule, the average american calls democracy. these kinds of de
congressman david scott have been been confronted by angry constituents and they'll join us in a moment. and remember this woman at senator arlen specter's town hall? >> we are tired of this. this is why everybody in this room is so ticked off. i don't want this country turning into russia, turning into a socialized country. >> her name is katie abrams and she'll be here to explain why she is fighting against health care reform. plus, new evidence shows that karl rove was more deeply involved in the firings of those u.s. attorneys during the bush administration. so is the law finally catching up to rove? "newsweek" investigative reporter michaelis cough will break it down for us, and how did the white house and the democrats get the strategy for justice sonia sotomayor's confirmation vote so right but drop the ball when it came to the message war over health care reform? and finally, president obama awarded the presidential medal of freedom to 16 recipients today, among them senator ted kennedy, sid no poitier, billie jean king and archbishop desmond tootoo of south africa wa. we begin
delta when we visited three years after ken's death when he said directly to us shell is responsible for my son's death. as we sat there listening to the father, the son and grandson, who i was sitting next to judith browne chomsky. she was our guest for the hour. judith browne chomsky was one of the leading attorneys in this case that led to this landmark settlement. when i asked noam tonight how he would like to be introduced, he said tell them i am the brother-in-law of judith browne chomsky. [applause] judith is married to noam's younger david, david. noam was born december 7, 1928 in philadelphia. by the age of ten, he was writing an extended essay against fascism and about the spanish civil war. don't be discouraged. [applause] at 14, he was getting his education, as he tells it, in the back of the 72nd street subway station here in new york. you go up the front, that is where you buy newspapers and the french newspaper stand where people would rush by, by their papers and go but it was the back, less populated stand where the stragglers would be where his uncle ran the newspap
of intelligence, nuclear weapons, our diplomacy, a close alliance with the u.s. will remain indispensable to the united kingdom. we have also imparted a frank message when needed. in my first speech as shadow foreign secretary in washington in 2006, i argue that in standing up for the rule of law, we must be careful not to imply methods that undermine it, and the reports of prisoner abuse leading to the torture of suspects it resulted in a loss of good will to america. the conservative party fully supports the foreign policy initiatives so far enacted by the obama administration. we are ready to work with our counterparts in washington. central to that work and the single most urgent priority in foreign policy when we come to government would be the american british and wider nato commitment in afghanistan. the conservative party supports the deployment of our armed forces in afghanistan. let me be clear that we are not in afghanistan to, for that country, but to bring about a situation where afghans can provide for their own security and livelihoods of not present a danger to the rest of
was deeper than anyone thought. it told us how close we were to the edge. it revealed that in the last few months, the economy has done better than expected. many suggest that part of this progress is directly attributable to the recovery act. this and the other difficult but important steps we have taken have helped put the brakes on this recession. we took action to stem the spread of foreclosures by helping responsible homeowners they in their homes. we helped to revive the credit markets and open up loans for families and small businesses. we enacted a recovery act that puts tax cuts directly in the pockets of middle-class families, extended unemployment insurance for people who lost their jobs, provided relief to struggling states to prevent layoffs, and made investments to put people back to work, rebuilding and renovating roads, bridges, schools, and hospitals. i realize that none of this is much comfort for those who are out of work or struggling. when we receive our monthly jobs report next week, it is likely to show that we're continuing to lose far too many jobs in this country.
. apparently kild by a u.s. missile strike. will it bring an endo his campaign of violence? > we mark the anniversary of thebrief but brutal war between russia and georgia bruleft hundds dead. tonight we look a the lacy of anger that remains. > how they s it. toght, we g the british take on anmerican investnt bank, goldman sachs. s huge profts and big bonues in spi of a sputteri economy have some wondering out govement connections. >>> and hell on earth tonight, we take you t a sulfur mine in java where the workers get a god wage, b may be paying with thr health. >>> from the world's leang rerters and analysts, here is what's happeng from around the world. this is "worldfocus. made possibl in part, by the following funders -- >>> good eveningi'm martin savie. >>> for months, he was the top target of the cia and pakistan's military, baullah mehsud, the head ofhe taliban in pakistan. a notorious militt commander wh controlled a widearea of pakistan'snorthwest. a man whe organization kild ndreds of secuty force and civilian today a senio taliban commander ispps meddudend hisde wife had b
- based forms of fuel that is killing us and telling the resources we need to survive. last summer when gas prices were so expensive, people were screaming to, isn't it terrible. it is tough to live without gasoline but a lot harder to live without water, three days, that is it. i think you bring up a great point in terms of realizing the true cost of the exploitation of those kinds of resources. host: wisconsin on our independent line. caller: first, i want to thank you for c-span. i want to thank the two young people for being on the air. it is so important. i don't remember if it was discovery, national geographic or the history channel but they showed a program where countries -- several countries in the world where they are playing with our weather and putting some kind of gas pump up into the ozone layer and it is affecting the way in that gulf stream patterns and other patterns, and it is influencing -- excuse me -- influencing our weather. and also, why can't governments all over the world outlaw plastic? it would create jobs and get rid of all of this crap all of our water? hos
own town hall meeting. steve: kelly joins us from washington, d.c.. tempers are flaring last night. >> we have seen a lot of this going on. in the state of maryland, we're talking about senator cardin. outside, you are looking at the protesters shouting. these are the protesters for and against health care. those are hearing and shouting at each other. fortunately, no violence. on the inside is where the sparks were flying as well. the vigorous debate continued on the inside. it was pretty much the same thing on the outside. here is what center been carted -- senator cardin was facing. >> united states ranks 37th on health care results out heaof 191 countries. >> if you will just allow the senator a few more moments and we will get to the questions >> basically, you have people using their right of free speech and been very vigorous in their debate against health care. this has been going on across the country. the president of the united states said he welcomes vigorous debate, but in the long run, he would like to see more cooler haneads prevail. brian: i heard the stuff was goin
. >> president bill clinton. >> killed by a u.s. missile strike. a terror offensive. and putin's show, more holiday again. welcome to this week. this week showed an emotional reunion, with the north korean president and a former president to pull it off. two journalists freed after bill clinton traveled halfway across the world to meet kim jong il. adam brooks reports on the return and the impact the episode might have on the un. >> their plane touched down at dawn. the two journalists had just been rescued from the prospect of 12 years in the korean labor camp. hannah lee, who is 4, had not seen her mother since the arrest at the border. >> we were taken to a location, and when we walked through the doors, we saw standing before us. >> it takes 10 weeks to assure the reunion. >> degree and we all saw on television is a source of happiness not only for the families, but for the entire country. >> the white house wanted this to be seen as a mission of mercy, but it might be more. it winds its way up the chain to the oval office. its nuclear weapons, missiles, and intentions, have been a worr
. this is it. this fire beginning on wednesday and now it's going to be a wild. that's it for us. much more straight ahead here on cnn throughout the evening. thanks so much for being with us. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world a terrific program for you. i want to show you once more an important and press sent interview i did back in april with former secretary of state james baker. i say prescient because in the voice of our conversation baker voiced some concerns about the few that you are that turned out to be correct. when i asked him how president obama was doing for instance, he warned the president not to take on too many big issues at once. he suggested that for obama to tackle health care so early in his presidency might be politically risky. and on international issues, the u.s. relationship with russia, the pull out from iraq, a number of others, he had fascinating insights that seem particularly relevant in light of recent events. i won't give it all away, but as you are listening to this shrewd political o
in this morning. you also reach us by e-mail, journal@c-span.org, and on twitter. the obama's are not in the white house this week, but the white house will have a special visitor this week. a philadelphia family will get a tour of the white house. one dozen of the descendants of jennings will view the famous gilbert stuart portrait of washington. the story this morning that we are asking you about is afghanistan. here is the front page of "the new york times." the military says that the afghan forces is insufficient. "military troops sought for procurement in war. the chief envoy to the region this weekend said that they did not have enough troops to do their job, pushed past their limits by taliban rebels who operate across the borders. taliban insurgents continued to bombard the towns and villages with rockets despite a new influx of american troops. in eastern afghanistan, a network of militants has become a main source of attacks against american troops and their afghan allies." further down, "the assessment comes after stanley mcchrystal revealed that he was working to complete a major war s
's campaign to make pakistan ungovernable. sources have said that he is killed and buried, killed in a u.s. air strike on wednesday. this is from our correspondent in as, bob -- islamabad. >> baitullah mehsud is rarely seen in public. the white house has called him "a murderous thug." >> we have clear information that so far we do not have any evidence to confirm that he is dead. there were several killed during these attacks. these are indications. >> he is accused of masterminding the assassination of former prime minister benazir bhutto, as well as dozens of other attacks. he has been linked to the bombing of the marriott hotel in islamabad which claimed more than 60 lives, and his stronghold has been a sanctuary for al-qaeda, a major concern for britain and the u.s.. but he is focused on targets here at home -- bombing pakistan because it backs the west. he declared war on his own country and people. some here have told us they do not believe he is dead. they have heard that before. others have said they feel a sense of relief and that this is good news, not just for pakistan, but also
's, it's certainly used as steve just referenced in not only russia's western periphery, but there are leaderships in central and eastern europe who are integrated into the european union and nato who are still quite concerned. and from their standpoints that could be justifiable. whether there will be russian military intervention into former central and east european territories -- and i'm speaking about countries already integrat into the european union and nato as full members -- i highly doubt it. however, when you see the european union as i just touched upon briefly in my presentation increasing this eastern partnership or outreach to your raise ya and os -- eurasia and ostensibly for energy assistance and development which includes countries such as georgia if i'm not mistaken, couries which may never become european union members in the next 5-10 years but i couldn't say for sure how that will evolve, i have to believe that it's less a matter of sphere of influence in military terms as it is in staking out the absolute requirement for energy supplies becausi don
2006. white house correspondent wendell goler joins us live with details. good evening, wendell. >> good evening, bret. house judiciary committee chairman john conyers released 5,400 pages of e-mails and other documents he says show the white house under former president george w. bush was, quote, the driving force behind the removal of a number of u.s. attorneys. the ranking republican on that committee, lamar smith of texas disagrees. he says there is no credible evidence of wrongdoing in the documents. he has accused the obama administration of politicizing the justice department, for dropping the charges against several black panthers accused of voter intimidation in philadelphia this past november. former u.s. attorney david iglesias figures most prominently in the bush administration documents. he was strongly criticized by new new mexico republicans for not prosecuting alleged voter fraud in 2004 that they felt might have hurt a republican candidate. iglesias told the congressional committee his firing was a political flogging. iglesias said the decision had been made aft
ted kennedy dies of brain cancer, and will advocates of healthcare reform try to use kennedy's death to boost their cause? a former c.i.a. inspector general talks about dick cheney's influence in his report on enhanced interrogations and south carolina's embattled governor answered a call from list second in command to step down. all that, plus the fox all-stars, right here, right now. welcome to washington. i'm he bret baier. senator edward kennedy is being remembered are today as an iconic larger than life figure who was the anchor of america's first family of politics. kennedy died tuesday night at his cape cod home a little more than a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. it was the final chapter in a he very public and often troubled life. >> at the end of our journey and always before us shines that ideal of liberty and justice for all. >> not by his own choosing, edward kennedy became the surrogate patriarch of a political dynasty, his life a series of triumphs an losses, all positions prominently in the public eye. he was the youngest of nine children, and by the ear
the doors, we saw standing before us president bill clinton. we were shocked, but we knew we were shocked, but we knew instantly in our hearts that th the nightmare of our lives was finally coming to an end. >> reporter: his mission accomplished, president clinton left the talking today to former vice president al gore, who founded current tv, where the women work. >> your families have been unbelievable. unbelievable. unbelievable. great hanna has been a great girl and which you were gone and your m your mother has been making your special soup for two days now. >> reporter: the women spent the shst of the day relaxing with reporter: tes. cial soup madel. by their mother. >> i know that there will be a sushi dinner at some point s extraordinarily relieved. >> reporter: today's menu -- fruit and that special soup made le their mother. neither woman gave any details of their ordeal today, but u.s. officials are certainly looking forward to hearing their story. president obama said today he was extraordinarily relieved. >> the reunion that we've all seen on television, i think is a source o
in a very readable book and i know that john and elizabeth had have special comments for us and join us for the q & a afterwards. so please join me in welcoming to the podium, john roberts. >> just a little bit over 50 years ago, a very enigmatc monk sailed into the harbor of new york to settle into the saw it's. i decided to start this morning talking about him, because he turned out to be the living human bridge in a changing political movement to maintain tibet's freedom that began as a cold war operation in the 1950's under president truman, and continued to become a counterculture cause up till today, where it's a mass global movement. and that transformation of a political movement to maintain freedom for an occupied country is really a kind of profound thing. the monk was a colmic mongolian. they shared tibetan buddhism going back 50 years with the dalai lama and the tibetan theocracy. he never would have come to the united states if it weren't for world war ii. at the end of world war ii, there were many displaced people in the soviet union including in mongolia and a coup of ca
with president obama's number one priority right now, health care reform. is it going to happen? joining us, james carville, the cnn contributor and democratic strategist. also joining us, ben stein, the economist and attorney, once was a speech writer for presidents nixon and ford. as you know, he's also a tv personality and actor. and joining us from las vegas, penn gillette, the illusionist, the best-selling author. he's the taller, more talkative half of penn & teller. they're performing, by the way, at the rio hotel and casino in las vegas. their program "b.s." is now in its seventh showtime series. he's a libertarian, as a lot of our viewers know. guys, thanks very much for coming in. the president was in new hampshire at a town hall forum today making his case for health care reform, and among other things he said this. >> under the reform we're proposing if you like your doctor you can keep your doctor. if you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan. you will not be waiting in any lines. this is not about putting the government in charge of your health insuran
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